video production

My Opinion: Libraries Need to Be Zones of the Possible

Witch's Broom region of Veil Nebula

People often go to the public library to get things done. For a public library to fulfill its mission, it needs to be a "zone of the possible." What that means is that every question asked in a library must be given the best possible answer — an answer that a community member might not have been able to find without help. Libraries that are firing on all cylinders are anticipating those questions and are assembling answers before the questions show up in living, breathing form.

The Next Chapter in a Library's Story: The Making of a Video

In 2000, the Patchogue-Medford Library published a book that told the story of the library's first hundred years. In 2013, the time seemed right to tell that story once more in a new medium: video.

New Technology Brings New Opportunities

With the increasing availability, democratization, and inexpensiveness of high-quality motion picture equipment and with the pervasive popularity of video sharing sites, libraries now have incredible opportunities. Promotion, publicity, and advocacy can now be off the printed page and into a new medium. Having already completed several other short video projects, the library decided to take on a more expansive video project that would tell a full story.

At the centennial of our library, our local history librarian wrote a book for children and their parents about the library's history. The Library Story was printed and published by our library.

In connection with our library's forthcoming expansion back into our original Carnegie Library building, the time seemed right to tell that story once more in another medium.

The Case for Video Booths at Public Libraries

Video booth at the UT Library
 
Public libraries could strongly benefit from having one or more "video booths," which are small, sound-insulated rooms for community members to perform various video- and multimedia-related tasks. 
 
The following tasks could be included:
 
  1. Creating screencasts, narrated explanations of activity on the computer screen.
  2. Engaging in Skype job interviews.
  3. Creating video book reviews for Amazon.com (see some examples).
  4. Participating in Google Hangouts.
  5. Recording spoken voice for digital storytelling projects using the free Audacity sound recording and editing software. (See my review of The Book of Audacity.)
  6. Recording of singing and other musical performances for YouTube or other purposes.
  7. Creating free multimedia educational content, such as animated children's stories.
  8. Recording "passion talk" videos, where community members speak directly to a webcam about a topic that stirs them — in the style of a TED talk.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.