Thinking about providing health info training for your community?

Thinking about providing health information training for your community? Here's advice from a pro! Dana Abbey is the Health Information Literacy Coordinator for the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, MidContinental region. She has a background in public libraries, library consultation, and prescription drug monitoring. In her current role, Dana works to improve the public's access to information to enable them to make informed decisions about their health.

1. Don't try to cover too much.

General sessions are less effective than sessions that are topical or targeted. Is there a particular audience you could target? Parents? Seniors? Teens? Caregivers? Or a particular topic? Workplace Wellness? Diabetes? Mental Health Concerns? Sessions like that are more useful and are easier to market.

2. Consider providing training at a local health fair.

The library could host a table or booth at which demonstrations of MedlinePlus (and other resources) are delivered.

3. Become a site for community health screenings.

While nurses are doing screenings, provide demonstrations of MedlinePlus (and other resources).

4. Information Rx has free materials.

Did you know you can get prescription pads printed with the URL of MedlinePlus from Information Rx?

5. Don't reinvent the wheel. Discover all that NN/LM provides.

Membership in NN/LM is free! It includes access to training and training materials. It is also the way to get your library listed as a consumer health library.

Interested in learning more?

Dana Abbey will be delivering a free webinar next Wednesday, April 17th, at 11 AM Pacific/2 PM Eastern. Register now to attend!

This session is a part of a series of webinars connected to the public access technology benchmarks from the Library Edge project. The April 17th session is based on Benchmark 3, which includes: The library supports use of public technology for health and wellness purposes.



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