technology

Edge Benchmarks: Gadget Instruction

In this blog series, we are exploring various technology training models in public libraries and sharing tips and real life success stories. In our last post, we looked at how to use volunteers as technology instructors in order to increase the impact of technology training programs. In this post, we look at how to expand technology training to include gadgets and mobile devices. We share best practices for using both library and user devices and for training on a wide range of platforms.

Want to learn more about TechSoup?

This morning, Stephanie Gerding and I delivered a ½ hour Introduction to TechSoup webinar for Oregon public libraries (thank you to the Oregon State Library for organizing this!). The session was designed to introduce staff in Oregon public libraries to TechSoup resources.

Learn more about LibraryYOU, Escondido Public Library's Local Knowledge Project

Anythink (CO) does such interesting things! I've been following tweets (here and here and here) about their TechFest, which is happening today and it sounds great. Donna Feddern from Escondido Public Library (CA) is a keynote speaker. If you can't hear her in Colorado today, you can check out the webinar she delivered with us last fall. Escondido's LibraryYOU is an inspiring project.

Feedback on Edge Benchmark: sharing expertise & best practices

We've been surveying the library community to get feedback on the Edge Initiative's beta benchmarks. Beta Benchmark 9 focused on libraries sharing their best practices and expertise. The new version of the benchmarks was just released, strengthened by your feedback! A bit of tweaking and consolidation happened so that Benchmark 9 is now Benchmark 6. There have been a few changes to the indicators, however the core benchmark remains the same. 

“Must Love Gadgets!” Small library’s new digital resources position is a bet on the future

When David Hanson was hired as the director of the Linwood (KS) Community Library, he knew he was going to want to make some changes and that those changes would not always be easy. One change involved staffing. A 20 hour per week clerk position was open at the library, but instead of hiring someone to fill that position, David saw it as an opportunity to help the library build for the future. He wanted to turn the clerk position into a position focused on digital resources. 

Edge Benchmarks: Volunteer Technology Trainers

In this blog series, we are taking a close look at technology training models in public libraries, sharing successful examples and identifying tips and best practices. We recently took a look at mobile lab instruction as a way to reach people in the community outside the library walls. In this post, we examine various ways to utilize volunteer technology instructors, bringing the skills and interests of the community into the library.

Knock, Knock, Your Librarian is Here!

When I first heard about the Poudre River Public Library District's (CO) "Tech-a-la-Carte," I was excited to learn about the training they are doing in their community, at community centers, and in other organizations. While working with Irene Romsa from Poudre River to prepare for an upcoming webinar, however, I learned that they actually take their mobile lab equipment into people's homes to provide technology training. Wow!

Edge Benchmark Seven: Whoa, Horsie!

TechSoup is part of a national coalition of 13 organizations working with the library field to create the first-ever set of technology benchmarks that define quality public access technology services in libraries. As part of this initiative, we are gathering feedback from libraries, and then sharing that feedback.

We recently compiled results from a survey focused on Benchmark 7. This benchmark states: 

Edge Benchmarks: Mobile Computer Labs

In this technology training blog series we identify tips and share best practices from public libraries. We have taken a look at individual technology instruction and open lab assistance as methods to provide flexible training in the library. This post explores several ways to offer technology instruction by taking computers out to the community.

Just so handy: The impact of smartphones on public access computer usage in libraries

Ever since I bought a smartphone, my digital camera, video camera, and Nook have been gathering dust on the shelf. I also find that I use my laptop a lot less on the weekends. It's just so handy to use my smartphone to do those things (take photos, shoot videos, read e-books, and check email). I also used to stop at libraries and coffee shops to use wireless when I was traveling. Now I just use my smartphone to keep up while away. Thinking about my own changed habits since acquiring a smartphone has me wondering, how are smartphones impacting public access computing in libraries?

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