public access computing

Making Mobile Devices and Computers Easier to Use for Seniors — Part Three — Audio Enhancements

Seniors using a laptop

This is the third of a three-part series on ways to make digital devices easier to use for seniors. It was originally published by Community Technology Network (CTN) and is reprinted here by permission of CTN executive director Kami Griffiths. All images in the piece are courtesy of CTN as well. Find the first part on magnification here. Find the second part on audio enhancements here.

Making Mobile Devices and Computers Easier to Use for Seniors — Part Two — Text and Icon Enhancements

Woman working on laptop in park

This is the second of a three-part series on ways to make digital devices easier to use for seniors. It was originally published by Community Technology Network (CTN) and is reprinted here by permission of CTN executive director Kami Griffiths. All images in the piece are courtesy of CTN as well. Find the first part on magnification here.

Making Mobile Devices and Computers Easier to Use for Seniors: Part One – Magnification

This is the first of a three-part series on ways to make digital devices easier to use for seniors. It was originally published by Community Technology Network (CTN) and is reprinted here by permission of CTN Executive Director, Kami Griffiths. All images in the piece are courtesy of CTN as well.

Elderly users of digital devices are increasing in numbers. More than half of online seniors in America use Facebook nowadays. As seniors continue to make up a growing portion of today's digital society, it is important that they be able to confidently use their devices. The following how-to directions will hopefully be useful for librarians to help their patrons with sight impairment to magnify text and images on their screens so they can more easily see them.

Edge Benchmarks: Gadget Instruction

In this blog series, we are exploring various technology training models in public libraries and sharing tips and real life success stories. In our last post, we looked at how to use volunteers as technology instructors in order to increase the impact of technology training programs. In this post, we look at how to expand technology training to include gadgets and mobile devices. We share best practices for using both library and user devices and for training on a wide range of platforms.

Edge Benchmarks: Volunteer Technology Trainers

In this blog series, we are taking a close look at technology training models in public libraries, sharing successful examples and identifying tips and best practices. We recently took a look at mobile lab instruction as a way to reach people in the community outside the library walls. In this post, we examine various ways to utilize volunteer technology instructors, bringing the skills and interests of the community into the library.

Edge Benchmarks: Mobile Computer Labs

In this technology training blog series we identify tips and share best practices from public libraries. We have taken a look at individual technology instruction and open lab assistance as methods to provide flexible training in the library. This post explores several ways to offer technology instruction by taking computers out to the community.

Stories + Data = Powerful Message

I spent the last couple of days in beautiful Telluride, Colorado at the R-Squared conference. I'll be blogging about various sessions and ideas over the next week, but thought I would start by sharing a video that was played during the opening session of the conference. Libraries: A Digital Bridge was created by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is an inspiring 4-minute look at the powerful role computers in libraries play in communities.

Just so handy: The impact of smartphones on public access computer usage in libraries

Ever since I bought a smartphone, my digital camera, video camera, and Nook have been gathering dust on the shelf. I also find that I use my laptop a lot less on the weekends. It's just so handy to use my smartphone to do those things (take photos, shoot videos, read e-books, and check email). I also used to stop at libraries and coffee shops to use wireless when I was traveling. Now I just use my smartphone to keep up while away. Thinking about my own changed habits since acquiring a smartphone has me wondering, how are smartphones impacting public access computing in libraries?

Edge Benchmarks: Open Lab Assistance

We are taking a close look at models of successful technology training programs and sharing ideas for how to create similar programs in your library. In our last post we looked at ways to provide individual technology instruction to maximize flexibility with one-on-one assistance. In this post we look at how offering assistance in an open lab format can also provide flexibility and focus to your technology training.

Edge Benchmarks: Individual Technology Instruction

In this TechSoup blog series we are exploring examples of successful technology training programs and giving practical advice on how to create similar programs in your library. We start off the conversation about technology training models with Model #1: Individual Instruction, and how to make it easy to implement for just about any library.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.