media lab

The Case for Video Booths at Public Libraries

Video booth at the UT Library
 
Public libraries could strongly benefit from having one or more "video booths," which are small, sound-insulated rooms for community members to perform various video- and multimedia-related tasks. 
 
The following tasks could be included:
 
  1. Creating screencasts, narrated explanations of activity on the computer screen.
  2. Engaging in Skype job interviews.
  3. Creating video book reviews for Amazon.com (see some examples).
  4. Participating in Google Hangouts.
  5. Recording spoken voice for digital storytelling projects using the free Audacity sound recording and editing software. (See my review of The Book of Audacity.)
  6. Recording of singing and other musical performances for YouTube or other purposes.
  7. Creating free multimedia educational content, such as animated children's stories.
  8. Recording "passion talk" videos, where community members speak directly to a webcam about a topic that stirs them — in the style of a TED talk.

The Library as a Newsroom

As a former tech reporter and current MLIS graduate, the intersection of libraries and journalism fascinates me. Really, the two go together perfectly: journalists seek factual information while libraries provide the resources to find it.

Partnerships are a Win-Win Strategy

The Auburn Public Library has forged a significant collaboration with Best Buy over the last year.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.