measurement

Five Questions You Might Have About Measuring Outcomes

Among Americans who visited a library in 2012, one in five attended a class, lecture, or program for adults. Did those visitors enjoy the program? Did they learn something from it? Will they attend another program like that? Or was it not what they expected? Unless you have psychic powers, you won't know what your patrons got out of a program or service unless you ask.

TechSoup for Libraries recently teamed up with the Public Library Association (PLA) on a webinar that gave an overview of outcome measurement from Project Outcome. This new program from PLA provides simple tools for libraries to measure programs across seven common service areas. The webinar also featured a Project Outcome user from a small library. Our webinar speakers were:

  • Samantha Lopez, Project Outcome in Chicago, Illinois
  • Robyn Truslow, Calvert Library in Prince Frederick, Maryland

Why use benchmarks?

As TechSoup and the other agencies working on the public access technology benchmark initiative get feedback and refine the benchmarks, the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) is doing a lot of work to document the process.

Those dreaded benchmarks: a rural librarian's perspective

Benchmarks. These are words of foreboding for this rural librarian. Great. On top of non-existent funding now the library is going to have to live up to some Queens Library-quality technological advancements.

Recap of Evaluating Digital Literacy Programs webinar

Today's webinar, "Evaluating Digital Literacy Programs" was packed with valuable information on how libraries and nonprofits might approach and implement an evaluation of a technology program. We were excited to collaborate with Community Technology Network on this event, and thrilled by the useful information experts shared.

January is a time for measurement

After just returning from a long winter's break--two weeks!--I've spent much of my day reading through email. What a joy to receive and share the following checklist from Carolyn Peterson at the Washington State Library. She shared, "January is a time for measurement: to determine how far the library has come and the distance it has yet to cover." Read it over, and consider the policies and programs your library offers.

Does your library have a: