marketing

Design, Create, and Inspire with Adobe Creative Cloud

This post was originally published on the TechSoup blog. At library conferences this past year, we regularly got one question: Are you getting Adobe Creative Cloud soon? Now we can finally give you the answer you want: Yes! Public libraries are eligible for discounted Creative Cloud individual licenses for staff. Your library can use Adobe Creative Cloud to create flyers, make promotional videos, design newsletters, and more. 

TechSoup is proud to announce the newest product in the Adobe donation program: Creative Cloud.

Creative Cloud is the evolution of Creative Suite: a suite of design applications for creating graphics, video, audio, and interactive content for print, the web, and mobile devices. You can use Creative Cloud to tell your story in a variety of media.

TechSoup offers access to 60 percent off the retail rate on the first year of a Complete plan membership for one user. Adobe will then automatically bill you at 40 percent off the retail rate for every year after until you cancel. You can request discounted rates for as many individual memberships as you need, and this offer is available to 501(c)(3) nonprofits and public libraries regardless of their size and budget.

This plan includes the full version of every Adobe Creative Cloud program, full access to its related services, access to Behance ProSite, and 20 GB of cloud storage space. Adobe also provides all updates and upgrades without any additional cost. See the program page for more details about this membership offered through TechSoup.

Can My Library Use That Image?

This post was originally published on the TechSoup blog. Librarians are naturally sensitive to copyright issues, but sometimes image permissions can be downright confusing. Here are some resources to help you determine which images are okay to use for your library's outreach efforts and marketing materials. 

cat looking at a cat picture on a computer monitor

With so many cute cat photos on the Internet, it's tempting to just grab one and use it on your website. But what are the rules and where can you get good public domain or Creative Commons images to spice up your website?

With the rise of visual social media (like Pinterest and Instagram), a clear trend in digital communications is more images and fewer words — even if you are communicating through your website or an email newsletter.

Top 10 Sources for Free Images for Your Library's Website or Newsletter

This post was originally published on the TechSoup blog. If you use marketing collateral, such as a newsletter, a Facebook page, or fliers for your outreach, you need good images to go along with it. But you also need to make sure that these images are okay to use. So where do you begin? We made a list of 10 free image sources to help you get started in your search. 

photo of red poppies on laptop screen

There are more places than ever to get free images that are entirely OK for you to use for your communications. Here are 10 sources for images you can freely use on your website or other communications channels. The following list is no particular order.

Social Networks and Marketing: the Lester Public Library Experience

I was hired for my first-time directorship at the Lester Public Library (LPL), Two Rivers, Wisconsin in March of 2007.  Becoming a part of this rural community of roughly 12,500 people driven by agriculture and manufacturing on the shores of Lake Michigan was going to be a challenge.  I wanted to have an active role in the community, sooner rather than later. To my delight, social networking helped me achieve this goal, quicker than I had ever envisioned.

Marketing with Images and Video Webinar

This morning I listened to the archived recording of Marketing with Images and Video: Engage, Inspire and Tell your Story a WebJunction webinar broadcast yesterday. It featured my good friend and engaging raconteur, Michael Porter (a.k.a. Libraryman), co-presenting with Jeff Dawson, director of Lester Public Library in Two Rivers, Wisconsin.

Library Savings Calculator -- How much is your libary worth to patrons?

I'm a big fan of calculators such as the IT Staff Calculator
that Lori Ayres developed for planning and estimating your IT staff
needs. They're not perfect of course, but they give you a sense of the
big picture and whether your projections line up with the experiences
of other libraries.