e-reader

Why Is It So Hard to Use E-books from the Library?

I would dearly love to say that e-books from the public library are wondrous things. Come to think of it, I did make that case in my post, Why Public Libraries Are Better than Amazon.

However, recently I had occasion to despair of the library e-book experience when I tried to check out Robin Hastings' book — Making the Most of the Cloud: How to Choose and Implement the Best Services for Your Library — from my local library.

E-Readers for Everyone: Teaching Tips Webinar

More than three-quarters of the nation's public libraries offer e-books, but many Americans don't know that this service is provided by their local library. Yet 58 percent of Americans have a library card, 69 percent say their local library is important to them, and many Americans would like to learn more about borrowing e-books.

Are E-Readers Greener than Books?

Currently the top selling electronic devices are e-readers like the Amazon Kindle, the Barnes & Noble Nook, the Sony Reader, and also the Apple iPad, which runs the iBooks application, a free e-book reader program and gateway to Apple's iBookstore. The question is: are e-readers greener than books?

Our library's Kindle

Due to the rise of e-book readers lately, we have decided to purchase and play with an Amazon Kindle. I chose the Kindle since it is the apparent leader in the e-book market right now, but it looks like things might be changing with the increasing number of e-book readers entering the market. With the recent announcement of the Apple iPad, things are going to get interesting.

New E-Reader Technologies and Social Benefit Organizations

Just like any good tech geek, I've been reading reviews and jealously drooling all the photos and videos of upcoming products shown at this past week's Consumer Electronics Show (CES). The annual Las Vegas tradeshow reveals the hottest new technologies, coolest gadgets, and flashiest concepts for all the geeky gear I hold dear. Most of the products either haven't hit the market yet or are at pricepoints out of reach for most average folks — and especially out of reach for many nonprofits, libraries, and public